Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

If you like The TCP/IP Guide, please consider the download version. It's priced very economically and you can read all of it in a convenient format without ads.

If you want to use this site for free, I'd be grateful if you could add the site to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on tcpipguide.com". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||tcpipguide.com^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The TCP/IP Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited.
If you want to read The TCP/IP Guide offline, please consider licensing it. Thank you.

The Book is Here... and Now On Sale!

Read offline with no ads or diagram watermarks!
The TCP/IP Guide

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  The TCP/IP Guide
 9  TCP/IP Application Layer Protocols, Services and Applications (OSI Layers 5, 6 and 7)
      9  Name Systems and TCP/IP Name Registration and Name Resolution
           9  TCP/IP Name Systems: Host Tables and Domain Name System (DNS)
                9  TCP/IP Domain Name System (DNS)
                     9  DNS Name Registration, Public Administration, Zones and Authorities

Previous Topic/Section
DNS Name Space Administrative Hierarchy Partitioning: DNS Zones of Authority
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
DNS Name Servers and Name Resolution
Next Topic/Section

DNS Private Name Registration
(Page 1 of 2)

We have now seen the hierarchical nature of the DNS name space, and the authority structure that administers it. Name registration begins with the generic and country code top-level domains (TLDs) within the root of the name hierarchy, proceeds to second-level domains within the TLDs, and then lower-level subdomains below those. As we progress down the name tree, we move from the most general, public authority (IANA/ICANN, which runs all of DNS), through the high-level TLD authorities, and eventually down to the level of individual organizations, corporations and individuals.

Private Domain Name Ownership

This “dividing line” between public authorities and private authorities occurs in many different places in the name structure. Wherever it does occur, below that line, responsibility for the domain becomes that of the organization that registered it. It can further subdivide the name space, granting parts of it to other organizations or even reselling it if they wish. Alternately, they may decide to use the name space to create a purely internal structure. I call this private name registration, in contrast to the public name registration we discussed earlier in this section.

For example, if a company called XYZ Industries registers “xyzindustries.com”, they become the owner of not just that domain name, but any subdomain structure or named items within it that they may choose to create. This is, of course, the beauty and power of authority delegation and the hierarchical structure. The company has an important decision that they must make however: they must choose whether they want to create names that are part of the global DNS name structure, or if they want to use names within the structure purely privately.

Using Publicly-Accessible Private Names

If a company wants names within its domain to be part of the global DNS name structure, it is required to perform the work necessary to properly set up and manage these names so they fit into the Domain Name System. The most common example, of course, is creating a public World Wide Web server. Most companies name such servers beginning with “www”, so XYZ Industries would probably wish to have the name “www.xyzindustries.com” for its WWW server address.

Obviously, they want and need anyone on the Internet to be able to locate this server. Thus, even though XYZ has private control of the “xyzindustries.com” domain, and thus owns the name “www.xyzindustries.com”, they must follow proper procedures for ensuring that DNS resource records are set up for their “www” subdomain so everyone on the Internet can find it. They may do this themselves, if they run their own DNS servers, or may have an ISP or other third party do it for them, as described in the previous topic.


Previous Topic/Section
DNS Name Space Administrative Hierarchy Partitioning: DNS Zones of Authority
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
DNS Name Servers and Name Resolution
Next Topic/Section

If you find The TCP/IP Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider purchasing a download license of The TCP/IP Guide. Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The TCP/IP Guide (http://www.TCPIPGuide.com)
Version 3.0 - Version Date: September 20, 2005

Copyright 2001-2005 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.